Monday, February 25, 2019

YouTube artist drawholic is a Prismacolor pencil savant in this video of drawing Pennywise the Clown.

My medium of choice when I illustrate in color is Prismacolor art pencils. I'm continually getting better over the years. Something about getting your ten thousand hours in comes to mind. However, I don't have the skill of drawholic (a YouTube person) and nor do I have their speed. They drew this picture of Pennywise in an impressive amount of time in what looks like all in one sitting, and they're using Prismacolor art pencils and some Strathmore Bristol 300s.

The reason I use Prismacolor pencils is because you can blend them on illustration paper, and I find that incredibly useful to achieve the kinds of shades that I want. But the thing that makes them blendable also causes a thing called "wax bloom" which can happen several months after the picture is finished. Basically, think of all of the incredibly bright colors being hidden under a haze of white wax that you have to scrape off in order to restore the vibrant colors. If you can finish your picture in fast enough time, you can treat the picture so that the bloom never happens, but you need to be diligent and fast and not set the picture aside for a while, i.e., you can't really take a break from it.

I also use Prismacolor pencils because you can clean up the mess really easy with a vacuum. You simply cannot say the same thing about paint. Anyway, if you have the time, watch the video. This person's process in making the Pennywise drawing is impressive and kind of mesmerizing.

5 comments:

  1. Very impressive. I was never about the speed.

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  2. There's an advantage of making my characters on the Sims, no wax bloom.

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  3. Some day I will again have an art space...

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  4. Pennywise is creepy. There's also a "bloom" in knitting. Different yarns can bloom, making the yarn fuzzier. Of course, this can make them warmer, so it's something that we knitters can like.

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  5. Sadly my own artistic abilities stopped evolving around sixth or seventh grade, so I admire people like you, Mike, for being able to draw so well.

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