Friday, October 28, 2011

Want to get paid for editing? My publisher is hiring.

In the yahoo group that my publisher runs, Deron Douglas, the CEO of Double Dragon Publishing posted this:
Hello All,
DDP is looking for new editors to help with the edit of 2012-2013 titles. If you know someone with experience and the need to make a difference, please have them contact me directly at deron@double-dragon-ebooks.com
Cheers,
Deron
I figured I'd post it for anyone that may have a little time on their hands that wants to make some money on the side and find out a little about how the publishing business works. I have no idea what they pay and nothing aside from this post on what is entailed. But if I had to "guess" it would be that they email you a Word document in .rtf form...maybe chapters at a time...and you go through and edit them using the "review" options in the word processor, making notes on the side and then when those are done, shipping them off to the writer.  Then I also assume that you would be paid through Paypal which is how they seem to conduct business for the authors. So, I'm thinking you would need a Paypal account. However, please don't quote me on this because I'm just "guessing".

Also on the marketing front, I found out that a guy named John Klawitter (Find his website here) is producing a radio show for Double Dragon authors (again through our Yahoo group). It's a one-hour thing and provides exposure by featuring a short story or flash fiction read aloud over the radio with a plug for the author's book after the reading (paid for by Double Dragon).

In my opinion, it's pretty original marketing, and I was intrigued by it because of the different approach.  I'm telling you guys simply because it gives a glimpse "behind-the-scenes" on a mid-size publisher and their attempts at helping authors to market their work...kinda like the "Little Engine that Could."  I'm not complaining because I think the idea is pretty awesome and when it starts up in either January or February I'm gonna tune in to it to see how well it is done.  I mean...this is not a Big Six publisher...they don't have billions of dollars so really any marketing that they do shows an "attempt" at selling their books rather than just sitting there like a limp noodle.

Now if only I could prod them to use their twitter account...

27 comments:

  1. It amazes me how many publishers and agents don't have a grip on the internets, poorly run and maintained websites, little or no interaction, and almost proud of it. Glad to see your publishers dipping their toe in the water.

    mood
    Moody Writing
    @mooderino

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  2. Can't wait to read your book :)

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  3. I love publishers that are new and hip. I don't have editing skills but I hope they find someone good.

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  4. Small publishers may not have the budget, but they have the ingenuity!

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  5. Hurm, they probably want you to have some kind of degree in English or literature, right? Damn it.

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  6. @moody: I think the whole aversion to technology has to do with being "older" and thus "stuck in the old ways" and having men at the helm instead of women. Steph would get mad at me for making generalizations, but I think that "in general" men hate social networking because they believe they don't need to social network because everyone should just realize how awesome they are--which is totally incorrect--but goes with the whole male ego thing.

    @Javid: Thanks

    @Clarissa: I'm sure they'll find "decent" ones. All non-Big 6 publishing houses suffer from the "editing blues". I've found some errors in the one or two titles I've read from my publisher. In Michelle Davidson Argyle's book "Monarch" from Rhemelda I found her name attached to the end of one sentence...like out of the blue...bam...her name in the middle of the text. Editing is hard.

    @Alex: They kind of have to have ingenuity to survive.

    @Brooke: I doubt age is a factor.

    @Mutt: I doubt that having a degree is a factor. I get the impression that they think like me.... To refresh your memory, I honestly believe that any monkey with a keyboard can get traditionally published. If people at the Big 6 want to take offense to my words...I really don't care. But I think it is true. I think that the people who get book contracts are just exceptionally good at "the game" of query letters and one-on-one pitching, etc. So that being said...if you have a pulse and can string words together well and are a grammar nazi...you could probably work for them. I doubt they want a degree.

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  7. Wish I had the time! This would be a much more enjoyable way to earn a bit o cash.

    Brooke, I keep telling you your age doesn't matter. You've got skills!

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  8. Thank you for posting this! And that's excellent news about the upcoming podcast. It's refreshing to hear about a publisher--no matter what the size--thinking out of the box.

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  9. Thanks for the heads up on the job opportunity. It is nice to get a heads up on what goes on behind the scenes. I think it would be a great job. However, no time :)

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  10. I'd love to get paid for editing. It would certainly getting paid to let people into fitting rooms.

    Thanks for the post!

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  11. Hmm..it's tempting to apply. Only thing is it might hinder my own writing. I also have one editing gig already. But thanks for mentioning it. :)

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  12. Being a Grammar Nazi would be fun. Then I could scream at authors, "No dangling participle for you!"

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  13. It's good to know that publishers are still doing their part. Innovativeness is wonderful in these times.

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  14. I like the fact your publisher is trying to find editors by networking through their authors. That sort of thing could create a happy and loyal community.

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  15. Years ago I read a bio of Maxwell Perkins, "Editor of Genius." It was a revelation because at the time I wasn't even sure what a literary editor did. He helped to shape works written by Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Wolfe and other giants, and in Wolfe's case that meant getting boxes of papers and turning them into a cohesive novel. Wow. Nowadays it seems editors complain they're not given the time to truly edit. Wonder if there's an undiscovered Max Perkins out there...

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  16. Sounds like you signed with a GREAT small press. I'm so excited to get my hands on your book.

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  17. Sounds like a pretty awesome opportunity! And the marketing thing is awesome. I love when people think outside the box.

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  18. They do sound innovative. Glad they're starting a show to promo their authors. I am a podcast junkie and will probably listen when they start putting stuff up.

    I'd make a lousy editor, I can't tell a period from a verb. I like that they openly requested help that way.

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  19. Meh, wish I had the experience. :D Oh well, someday.

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  20. It sounds like you and them Yahoos of yours have something going.

    Are you going to edit? There is no way I have time, but I love the idea.

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  21. It sounds like a great gig for someone who is at home writing and needs some extra $$,(that wouldn't be me of course) that was nice of you to pass it along.

    And anything a publisher does to help with marketing is great anymore so I think this is great!

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  22. One of my blogger friends, VR Barkowski is into English lit. If I remember I will pass on the message or ask her to check your blog.

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  23. I might check it out. I'm lousy at english lit stuff, but but can catch obvious mistakes - like an author name inappropriately placed :)

    Thanks Michael.

    ......dhole

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  24. Sounds like a great opportunity, but I have to go edit my own stuff or I'll never finish this blasted manuscript! :)

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  25. I hope your pubber finds good editors. ;)

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  26. This souns like a pretty clever idea. :)

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